Vers l’élaboration d’un lexique standard pour l’évaluation sensorielle des légumineuses et des ingrédients dérivés des légumineuses

Citation

Chigwedere, C.M., Wanasundara, J.P.D., Shand, P.J., 2021. Towards development of a standard lexicon for sensory assessment of pulses and pulse-derived ingredients. 14th Pangborn Sensory Science Symposium
‘Sustainable Sensory Science’ Vancouver (virtual) Vancouver 2021/08/09 - 2021/08/12.

Résumé en langage clair

The full potential of pulses and pulse ingredients is constrained by inherent or residual tastes, aromas and flavor which may be objectionable and referred to as off-flavors. For some consumers pulses and foods containing pulse ingredients deviate from the sensory memory of the desired experiences of the consumers because the inherent tastes, aromas and flavors. This poster communication provides a systematic approach, namely a standard lexicon for sensory assessment of pulses and pulse products. A literature review was conducted to consolidate data and terminology used in sensory assessment of pea, chickpea, lentil, faba bean, dry bean, bambara groundnut, lupin, pigeon pea and cowpea, and their derived ingredients. The surveyed studies involved sensory assessment of processed whole seeds, slurries of flour and protein extracts and processed foods in which pulse ingredients were incorporated and the sensory qualities of focus were (basic) taste, aroma (perceived through sniffing), and flavor (perceived through in-mouth processing). Using this information, a sensory wheel was developed for pulses and pulse ingredients. The most widely perceived basic taste and aroma/flavor is bitterness and beany, respectively, and the latter is complex, with sub-descriptors that are ill-defined. Some sensory terms are used inconsistently, with one term describing different sensations or several terms describing a single sensation, which justifies establishment of a standard lexicon. The findings necessitate elucidation of the aftertaste and direct future work to developing, refining and validating the standard lexicon for use by the food industry, consumers and for academic research.

Résumé

Progressively, pulse-derived ingredients are partially or completely replacing conventional animal protein and cereal ingredients in baked, extruded, meat, and dairy-based beverage products as more consumers are adopting plant-forward diets. However, exploitation of the full potential of pulses and their derived ingredients is constrained by inherent or residual (during extraction of ingredients from pulses) tastes, aromas and flavor which may be objectionable. The objectionable organoleptic qualities are generally referred to as off-flavors. Some consumers shun pulses and foods containing pulse ingredients because the inherent tastes, aromas and flavor deviate from the sensory memory of the desired experiences of the consumers. In a quest to gain insight into the sensory qualities of pulses and pulse ingredients, a literature review revealed that a more systematic approach, namely a standard lexicon for their sensory assessment is lacking. As a baseline study, the terms that were used for sensory assessment of pea, chickpea, lentil, faba bean, dry bean, bambara groundnut, lupin, pigeon pea and cowpea, and their derived ingredients in literature were consolidated. The surveyed studies involved sensory assessment of processed whole seeds, slurries of flour and protein extracts and processed foods in which pulse ingredients were incorporated and the sensory qualities of focus were (basic) taste, aroma (perceived through sniffing), and flavor (perceived through in-mouth processing). Using this information, a sensory wheel was developed for pulses and pulse ingredients. The most widely perceived basic taste and aroma/flavor is bitterness and beany, respectively, and the latter is complex, with sub-descriptors that are ill-defined. Some sensory terms are used inconsistently, with one term describing different sensations or several terms describing a single sensation, which justifies establishment of a standard lexicon. The findings necessitate elucidation of the aftertaste. Future work involves developing, refining and validating the standard lexicon for use by the food industry, consumers and for academic research.

Date de publication

2021-08-09