The root-lesion nematode, Pratylenchus penetrans, has similar effects on early growth and physiology of M.9, G.41 and G.935 apple rootstocks under field conditions

Citation

King, L., Forge, T., Munro, P., Xu, H., Jones, M. 2021. The root-lesion nematode, Pratylenchus penetrans, has similar effects on early growth and physiology of M.9, G.41 and G.935 apple rootstocks under field conditions. British Columbia regional meeting, 2021/Réunion régionale de la Colombie-Britannique, 2021, Canadian Journal of Plant Pathology, 45:1, 1-5, DOI: 10.1080/07060661.2022.2102280. Published online: 29 Jul 2022.

Résumé

The root-lesion nematode, Pratylenchus penetrans, is a ubiquitous parasite of roots of temperate fruit trees. It affects early growth of trees replanted into old orchard sites where populations have built up, and may contribute to decline complexes of older trees. Most BC apple acreage is planted with M.9 rootstock, but growers are increasingly considering Geneva-series rootstocks such as G.41 and G.935 for their apparently greater disease tolerance. However, the responses of these rootstocks to P. penetrans, specifically, are poorly known. To compare the resistance and tolerance to P. penetrans of G.41, G.935 and M.9 rootstocks (‘Ambrosia’ scion), a field microplot experiment was established in spring of 2020 at the Summerland Research and Development Centre. The experimental design is a 2 × 3 factorial combination of: P. penetrans inoculation (±) and rootstock (G.41, G.935, M.9), with 20 replicate microplots of each of the six treatment combinations arranged in a randomized complete block design. The P. penetrans inoculum was 5400 P. penetrans/microplot or 54/L soil. In the establishment year (2020), P. penetrans caused significant reductions in leaf area, shoot growth, and trunk cross-sectional area. In 2021, shoot growth and trunk cross-sectional area were reduced by P. penetrans. The nematode also reduced rates of photosynthesis and transpiration, increased stem water potential, and reduced leaf nitrogen content. In both years, the effects of P. penetrans were similar for all rootstocks. These data suggest that while G.41 and G.935 may have other benefits over M.9, they are equally susceptible to P. penetrans.

Date de publication

2023-01-02

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