La TIS pour controler la mouche du chou: une alternative au controle chimique?

Citation

Fortier, AM. 2021. La TIS pour controler la mouche du chou: une alternative au controle chimique? Les vendredis horticoles de la Monteregie (lutte integree). Decembre.

Résumé en langage clair

Sterile insect release (SIR) is a method to reduce damage from an insect by interfering with their ability to create viable eggs. Cabbage root maggot is a candidate for this strategy as the species has a continual colony which ensures high numbers of pupae for sterilization and subsequent release into commercial fields. Testing of this method in Nova Scotia occurred in 2021 whereby shipments of sterile flies from Quebec were received and released into commercial broccoli fields and on-site radish plots located at the Kentville Research and Development Centre. Following each release, plants were surveyed for eggs. Eggs were collected and returned to the lab where they were identified to species then maintained until they hatched. Results from this single field season confirmed that sterile flies will survive being shipped to Nova Scotia and will persist in the field following release. Of the eggs collected, the majority were from a secondary root maggot species, D. platura. Less than half of the eggs from the cabbage root maggot (D. radicum) hatched indicating that the sterile flies were having some effect when exposed to wild populations. Further field experiments are needed to confirm these results and evaluate the potential for this strategy to reduce damage from root maggots.

Résumé

Sterile insect release (SIR) is a method to reduce damage from an insect by interfering with their ability to create viable eggs. Cabbage root maggot is a candidate for this strategy as the species has a continual colony which ensures high numbers of pupae for sterilization and subsequent release into commercial fields. Testing of this method in Nova Scotia occurred in 2021 whereby shipments of sterile flies from Quebec were received and released into commercial broccoli fields and on-site radish plots located at the Kentville Research and Development Centre. Following each release, plants were surveyed for eggs. Eggs were collected and returned to the lab where they were identified to species then maintained until they hatched. Results from this single field season confirmed that sterile flies will survive being shipped to Nova Scotia and will persist in the field following release. Of the eggs collected, the majority were from a secondary root maggot species, D. platura. Less than half of the eggs from the cabbage root maggot (D. radicum) hatched indicating that the sterile flies were having some effect when exposed to wild populations. Further field experiments are needed to confirm these results and evaluate the potential for this strategy to reduce damage from root maggots.

Date de publication

2021-12-03

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