Biogenic amine concentrations and evolution in “chilled” Canadian pork for the Japanese market

Citation

Ngapo, T.M., Vachon, L. (2017). Biogenic amine concentrations and evolution in “chilled” Canadian pork for the Japanese market. Food Chemistry, [online] 233 500-506. http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.foodchem.2017.04.120

Résumé en langage clair

Consumption of foods containing high concentrations of biogenic amines can present a health hazard through the direct toxic effect of these compounds. Studies on whole fresh meat generally show relatively low levels of biogenic amines, but some amines have been observed in significant concentrations during extended storage. One of the few commercial situations requiring long term storage of fresh meat is “chilled” exportation. In this type of transport, fresh meat is chilled within 48 h of slaughter to strictly controlled temperatures below 0 °C, without freezing, and is held under these conditions for several weeks. This type of exportation achieves meat that competes in the fresh market at the end of transportation and is of high value to the meat industry. Two studies in the scientific literature show the presence of toxic levels of biogenic amines after this type of storage. In the current study, researchers aimed to evaluate concentrations of biogenic amines and their evolution in Canadian pork destined for the Japanese market. At 48 h post mortem, pork loin samples were aged at -1.7 °C for 13, 28, 43 or 58 d (chilled) or 4.0 °C for 5 d (fresh). Increasing concentrations of three biogenic amines were observed with storage time and another was detected only at the two longest times. The concentrations of biogenic amines in Canadian pork after chilled exportation to the Japanese market were, however, sufficiently low to pose no risk of intoxication.

Résumé

The aim of this study was to evaluate concentrations and evolution of biogenic amines in Canadian pork destined for the Japanese market. At 48 h post-mortem, export quality loins were aged at −1.7 °C for 13, 28, 43 or 58 d (chilled) or 4.0 °C for 5 d (fresh). Increasing concentrations of putrescine, spermine and spermidine were observed with chilled ageing period and were greater in chilled export (43 d at −1.7 °C) than domestic market (5 d at 4.0 °C) pork equivalents. Cadaverine was detected, but was not influenced by ageing conditions, and tyramine was only detected in some samples after 43 days at −1.7 °C. Individual biogenic amines were not correlated with their precursor amino acids. Biogenic amines in Canadian pork for the chilled export Japanese market were not in sufficiently high concentrations to pose a risk of intoxication.

Date de publication

2017-10-15

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