Charlottetown Research and Development Centre

  • Agro-Ecosystem
  • Potatoes
  • Biodiversity
  • Horticulture
  • Cereal Crops

The Charlottetown Research and Development Centre (Charlottetown RDC) was established in 1909 in Charlottetown, Prince Edward Island. It is one of Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada's (AAFC) network of 20 research and development centres. 

The Centre is associated with two satellite locations:

  • Main laboratory and office complex in Charlottetown; and

  • Harrington Research Farm with field and greenhouse research facilities north of Charlottetown.

Areas of Research

The focus of Charlottetown RDC science activities is on environmental sustainability, diversification and innovation in primary production agriculture, and the discovery and exploitation of bio-based products from new and traditional crops.

The Charlottetown RDC conducts research on diversified, integrated cropping systems with a focus on crop rotations, agronomy of new crops species or cultivars, characterization of crop nutrient cycles and their effects on soil and water quality, as well as the integrated and sustainable management of weeds, insects, and diseases.

Sector Needs

The Charlottetown RDC supports innovative research, development, technology and knowledge transfer activities related to the following AAFC Science Sector Strategies:

 

 

    Scientists and researchers

    Vegetable Pathology Technician
    Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada

     

    Image Bourlaye Fofana
    Research Scientist
    Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada

     

    Image Adam Foster
    Research Scientist
    Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada

     

    Image Andrew McKenzie-Gopsill
    Research Scientist
    Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada

     

    Image Jason L. McCallum
    Research Scientist: Phytochemistry
    Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada

     

    Image Yefang Jiang
    Research Scientist
    Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada

     

    Image Judith Nyiraneza
    Research Scientist
    Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada

     

    Image Morteza Mesbah
    Research Scientist
    Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada

     

    Publications

    1. Aiyer, H., Caldwell, C., & Foster, A. (March 5-6, 2021). Effects of cover cropping on beneficial and pathogenic microbial communities present in agricultural field soil and residue. Presented at the 2021 Plant Science Graduate Students’ Symposium (University of Saskatchewan).

      2021 - View publication details

    2. Aiyer, H., Caldwell, C., & Foster, A. (2021). Cover crop carryover effects on fungal and bacterial communities in field soil and residue. Presented at the CRDC Seminar series (February 10, 2021).

      2021 - View publication details

    3. Aiyer, H., Caldwell, C., & Foster, A. (2020). Disease suppressive ability of certain society cover crop soils on barley and soybean root disease. Presented at the Canadian Phytopathological Society Atlantic regional meeting, 2020. Abstract submitted to be published in Canadian Journal of Plant Pathology

      2020 - View publication details

    4. Foster and Matters (2020) FUSARIUM HEAD BLIGHT CAUSAL SPECIES IN SPRING WHEAT IN PRINCE EDWARD ISLAND IN 2019. Published In: Canadian Plant Disease Survey 2020 Volume 100: Disease Highlights 2019, Canadian Journal of Plant Pathology, 42:sup1, 1-175, DOI: 10.1080/07060661.2020.1752524

      2020 - View publication details

    5. Till BJ, Aravena Abarzua GA, Howard-Till R, Qian R, Gajardo H, Cloutier S, Fofana B, Soto-Cerda BJ (2020) Genomic improvement of flax using natural variation and induced mutations. Proc 28th Plant and Animal Genome Conference, San Diego, USA, Jan 11-15, W436

      2020 - View publication details

    6. Humphreys G, Cummiskey A, MacEachern D, Kalikililo A, Thomsen C, Langille L, Foster A, Hadinezhad M, Fregeau-Reid J, Blackwell B (2019) Winter Wheat Improvement for Eastern Canada: Update 2019. Presented at 2019 Ann. Gen. Meeting of Maritime Branch of CSGA, Dec. 4-5, 2019, Moncton, NB.

      2019 - View publication details

    7. Cultivated potato (Solanum tuberosum L.) is the third most consumed food crop after rice and wheat. Potato is an auto tetraploid crop species having a highly heterozygous genetic base and a complex genome making its genetic studies tedious. Recently, diploid potato breeding has regained interest in the potato genetics community. Genetically, diploid potatoes are easy to work with and can be used in the cultivated potato breeding process as genetic resources and also they can be grown on their own as varieties. However, diploid breeding continuum faces many challenges including anti-nutritional factors and self-incompatibilities. Whereas conventional breeding strategies contributed to the releasing of varieties with low SGA, substantial resources are still required to minimizing these anti-nutritional factors. Recently, we developed and characterized an ethyl methane sulfonate mutagenized pre-breeding diploid potato population for identifying lines with low anti-nutritional factors. The data will be presented and discussed in relation to the high potential for diploid potatoes as a complement to tetraploid potatoes and in pre-and post-harvest management contexts.

      2019 - View publication details

    8. Das, Q., Lepp, D., Yin, X., Ross, K., McCallum, J.L., Warriner, K., Marcone, M.F., Diarra, M.S. (2019). Transcriptional profiling of Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis exposed to ethanolic extract of organic cranberry pomace, 14(7), http://dx.doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0219163

      2019 - View publication details

    9. https://pag.confex.com/pag/xxvii/meetingapp.cgi/Session/5691

      2019 - View publication details

    10. Mesbah, M., Pattey, E., Jégo, G., 2018. An improved precipitation indicator for corn yield prediction: proof of concept using STICS model in eastern Canada. American Geophysical Union annual meeting, Washington (DC), 10-14 December 2018. (Poster)

      2018 - View publication details