Dietary citrus pulp and grape pomace as potential natural preservatives for extending beef shelf life

Citation

Tayengwa, T., Chikwanha, O.C., Gouws, P., Dugan, M.E.R., Mutsvangwa, T., Mapiye, C. (2020). Dietary citrus pulp and grape pomace as potential natural preservatives for extending beef shelf life. Meat Science, [online] 162 http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.meatsci.2019.108029

Plain language summary

The feeding of citrus and winery byproducts to cattle has potential to reduced their disposal costs and environmental impact while providing alternative feedstuffs for beef production. The antioxidants found in citrus and winery byproducts also have potential to impact beef shelf life. In the present study we compared the shelf-life of beef from steers fed 15% dried citrus pulp (DCP) or grape pomace (DGP) for 90 days. The antioxidant activity, bacterial load, and lipid and protein oxidation were evaluated on the longissimus lumborum during retail storage. Beef antioxidant activity was highest when feeding DGP and lowest in control fed steers. Beef from steers fed DGP or DCP had a lighter colourshigher and fewer coliform bacteria than steers fed the control diet. Beef peroxidation products and carbonyl contents (i.e. markers for rancidity) lowest in DGP and highest control (P ≤ 0.05). Our findings indicate that DGP could be a better natural preservative than DCP when included in beef cattle finishing diets.

Abstract

The shelf-life of beef was compared from 7-months old Angus steers (281 ± 15.4 kg initial body weight) fed 150 g/kg DM dried citrus pulp (DCP) or grape pomace (DGP) for 90 days. The antioxidant activity, bacterial load, and lipid and protein oxidation were evaluated on the longissimus lumborum subjected to air-permeable packaging at days 1, 3, 5, 7 and 9 post-slaughter. Beef antioxidant activity was DGP > DCP > control (P ≤ 0.05). Beef from steers fed DGP or DCP had higher L* values (P ≤ 0.05) and fewer (P ≤ 0.05) coliform counts than steers fed the control diet. Beef antioxidant activity was DGP > DCP > control (P ≤ 0.05). Beef TBARS and carbonyl contents were DGP < DCP < control (P ≤ 0.05). Overall, antioxidant activity decreased (P ≤ 0.05), while bacterial loads, TBARS and carbonyl contents increased (P ≤ 0.05) during retail display for all diets. Current findings indicate that DGP could be a better natural preservative than DCP when included in beef cattle finishing diets.

Publication date

2020-04-01